Want to live like a king? Bid for a boar

Your boar…? The gold replica created by Charmian Ottaway. Photograph: York Museums Trust
29 Jul 2013 @ 9.02 pm
| News
Your boar…? The gold replica created by Charmian Ottaway. Photograph: York Museums Trust
Your boar…? The gold replica created by Charmian Ottaway. Photograph: York Museums Trust

Got a couple of grand to spare and fancy some medieval style bling? Then your luck’s in, as the Yorkshire Museum is auctioning off the world’s only gold replica of a Richard III boar badge.

The museum commissioned the 18 carat gold copy of the king’s emblem as part of York’s year-long programme of events entitled Richard III: Rumour and Reality.

Based on the rare 15th Century silver badge on show in the museum, the replica has been created by jeweller Charmian Ottaway. Such badges were originally worn by supporters of Richard III (1483-1485) with precious metal versions given to his most loyal supporters.

The replica will be auctioned by the Yorkshire Museum, with the money raised being put towards the museum’s acquisition fund. The piece has a reserve price of £2,000.

People can bid in the silent auction by dropping off sealed bids at a collection point at the Yorkshire Museum or by emailing [email protected]

Natalie McCaul, curator of archaeology, said: “Since we acquired the badge we have been inundated with requests by people wanting to buy replicas of it to wear as a symbol of their interest in Richard III.

“We asked Charmian to make a mould which we have used to create silver versions of the badge to sell in our shop. However we thought we would make a unique 18 carat gold badge so one lucky person can be the proud owner of the only one in existence.”

The auction for the badge has started, with the winner being announced in October. The pewter and silver badges are on sale in the Yorkshire Museum shop.

The original silver gilt livery badge in the form of a boar, a symbol of Richard III, was found by a metal detectorist in 2010 near Stillingfleet, North Yorkshire.

It is one of only a relatively small number ever found and because it is silver-gilt it would have once belonged to someone of high status.

Gold ones were also in existence at the time of Richard III but were extremely rare.