TV star Jeff Stelling walks through York on Tuesday – here’s where to cheer him on

Heading to Bootham Crescent: Jeff Stelling
21 Mar 2016 @ 7.52 pm
| Charity, Sport

TV star Jeff Stelling will be walking through the centre of York on Tuesday (Mar 22) – and you can cheer him on.

Legendary anchor of Sky Sports’ Soccer Saturday, Jeff is aiming to complete ten marathons in ten days, by walking from one football ground to another.

You can sponsor Jeff here

Already his Men United March has raised £150K for Prostate Cancer UK, as well as raising awareness of how this disease claims one man’s life every hour.

It began from his own club of Hartlepool United on Monday.

On Tuesday he sets off from York City’s Bootham Crescent ground at 8am and walks past the Minster and Clifford’s Tower through the centre of town before heading down by the river, over the Millennium Bridge and out of the city towards Tadcaster.

Almost 30 miles after setting off he’ll arrive at Elland Road, home of Leeds United.

The itinerary
07:00 Registration and breakfast, York City FC
08:00 Depart York City FC
11:40 Arrive Tadcaster Albion FC
12:00 Depart Tadcaster Albion FC
17:45 Arrive Sky Bet offices (2 Wellington Pl, Leeds, West Yorkshire LS1 4AP)
17:50 Depart Sky Bet offices
18:30 Arrive Leeds United FC

Cut deaths in half

Jeff and supporters, including former Tony Blair spin doctor Alastair Campbell, at the Hartlepool United starting line
Jeff and supporters, including former Tony Blair spin doctor Alastair Campbell, at the Hartlepool United starting line

Later in his march, Jeff will stop off at the Aston Villa, Leicester and Chelsea grounds.

Having seen his friends hit by the disease the former Countdown presenter is passionate about the cause.

He said:

Last month Prostate Cancer UK warned that the number of men in the UK dying from the disease will soar unless urgent action is taken.

If the rising death trend continues, by 2026 prostate cancer will kill over 14,500 men every year.

However, they estimate that deaths could be cut in half if the key areas of improving diagnosis and treatment can be resolved in the next ten years.