The theatre to see in York this month, May 2014

House Of Tragic She by Six Lips Theatre. Photograph: Adam Greenwood
2 May 2014 @ 8.36 am
| News

May is here and the York Theatres seem to be lashing back against the warming sun with a programme of depression, cloning, violence and the paranormal. Hopefully they’re keeping it all on the stage (unless rehearsals are going particularly badly) but it promises to be a month of weighty issues, powerful performances and challenging thought-provoking theatre. And we’ve even got a splash of the film world to tempt you too.

A Number

Caryl Churchill’s fabulous cloning double hander is a personal favourite of mine and a fabulously creative piece of writing for a pair of actors to get their teeth into.

So it’s even more interesting that the Father and Son(s) roles are being taken by real life father and son George and Niall Costigan. Hugely thought provoking, tense and disturbing – this is a must see in my book.

Thursday, May 1 to Saturday, May 24, York Theatre Royal Studio
Full details here

House of Tragic She preview

House Of Tragic She by Six Lips Theatre. Photograph: Adam Greenwood
House Of Tragic She by Six Lips Theatre. Photograph: Adam Greenwood

York’s inimitable Six Lips Theatre are running an early preview ( or “sharing” as they’re describing it) of their upcoming festival show The House Of Tragic She. Exploring the complex and frequently ignored issue of women’s mental health, solitude, imagination and dreams, this forms part of the Love Arts Festival York.

Six Lips have a habit of creating wildly ambitious and creative work that never does what you expect but always surprises.

Friday, May 16, York St John University, Theatre 4, Lord Mayor’s Walk
Go here to book tickets

Blithe Spirit

The cast of Blithe Spirit at York Theatre Royal. Photograph: Anthony Robling
The cast of Blithe Spirit at York Theatre Royal. Photograph: Anthony Robling

Damien Cruden directs Noel Coward’s classic supernatural comedy. When an author’s attempts to gain inspiration for his new book cause his cantankerous first wife to come back to haunt him, his world is threatened with chaos. Worth it for the character of the clairvoyant Madame Arcati alone, which is a gift for an older comic actor.

Friday, May 9 to Saturday, May 31, Theatre Royal
Full details here

The Knife That Killed Me

Pilot Theatre artistic director Marcus Romer has been a busy chap. Not content with bringing the First World War to the streets of York, as well as steering one of the country’s most innovative theatre companies, he’s now entered the world of feature film directing.

The Knife That Killed Me is an adaptation of the novel by Anthony McGowan and alongside Kit Monkman, and a brace of Yorkshire filmmaking talent, Romer has brought what looks like a wonderfully dark, disturbing and challenging vision to the screen.

York is blessed with a filmmaking community that far exceeds that of much bigger cities and frequently works hand in hand with theatre companies – and vice versa to fabulous effect. The Knife That Killed Me trailer does nothing to dispel that tradition – it looks remarkable!