York parents can’t understand their child’s school report and don’t even know what SATs are, a study has revealed.

They find key education terms so baffling that they are confused by comprehension, can’t crack decoding and are flummoxed by phonics.

Altogether 72% of York parents say they feel out of the loop when it comes to their child’s learning and changes in education, while 31% say they can’t make head nor tail of their child’s school report.


A massive 77% of parents in York feel that today’s teaching methods are unnecessarily complicated.

The survey of 2,000 parents by tuition provider, Explore Learning which has centres across the area, has revealed that an astonishing 87% of parents in York say that the way the education system has changed in recent years has confused them with many not having a clue about certain education terms.

The research by Explore Learning shines a light on the common confusions of parents today, revealing a massive gap in knowledge in what is one of the most important things in their child’s lives.

York parents seem to be the most in the dark with nearly one in three (29%) not having a clue about what any of the most common education terms mean.

Standards are higher

Students celebrate A level success at Archbishop Holgate’s School last year
However, while parents appear confused by today’s school system, 74% of York’s parents believe that the standard of education today is better than when they were young.

The main reason for this is credited to better teachers with better training, more resources, and the fact that today there’s a bigger focus on children’s mental health.

Head of curriculum at Explore Learning Charlotte Gater says:

  • It’s reassuring to see that the majority of parents believe that the education system is better than when they were growing up but it’s worrying to find so many in the dark around the national curriculum today.

    The government needs to provide clearer guidance when it comes to helping parents understand just what is going on with their children at school.

    It’s hard enough helping them with their homework, let alone getting to grips with new academic terms and changes happening in the curriculum every few years.