From the First World War to ‘idiots smeared in poo’ – York history explored

Horrible Histories on CBBC, subject of one of the lectures
7 Jan 2014 @ 8.20 pm
| Entertainment, History
Horrible Histories on CBBC, subject of one of the lectures
Horrible Histories on CBBC, subject of one of the lectures

York’s rich history, from TV reenactments to the First World War, is explored in a new programme of public lectures.

The series opens on Wednesday, January 8, when Alison Bodley takes as her topic Public history, private past: Discovering the history of York during the First World War.

Alison, curator of history at the York Museums Trust, will consider the city’s experience of the Great War, and discuss the refit of the Castle Museum and plans for the new exhibition 1914: When the World Changed Forever.

The lecture is open to all, free to attend and no ticket is required. It takes place at King’s Manor at 6pm.

The Public History: Made in York lecture series is organised by York University’s Institute For The Public Understanding Of The Past (IPUP). They provide an opportunity to meet the people who make history public in museums, archives, stately homes and on television.

Another talk in the series is by Greg Jenner, historical consultant to CBBC’s Horrible Histories. His lecture has the irresistible title Lavish dramas, thoughtful documentaries and idiots smeared in poo: Why making historical television is harder than you think.

Others look at York’s renewed City Archives, and alternative histories of the city.

“The series of lectures will highlight recent developments in history by, with and for the public in archives, museums, country houses, and in popular festivals and on television,” said Dr Sarah Rees Jones, director of IPUP,

“It originates from the Department of History’s new MA in Public History. All the lecturers teach on that MA and are among the leading practitioners of public history in their fields.”

The lectures

January 15 2014 A gateway to history? A new York City Archive for the 21st Century
January 22, 2014 Making alternative histories in York: from outside and below
January 29, 2014 Commemorating the First World War in the Yorkshire Country House
February 5, 2014 The Digital Past: Accessing Old Knowledge or Creating New Understanding?
February 11, 2014 The Eighth-Century Northern Renaissance: Cultural Triumphs in Anglo-Saxon Northumbria
February 19, 2014 Lavish dramas, thoughtful documentaries and idiots smeared in poo: Why making historical television is harder than you think
February 26, 2014 Living in the past: Re-enactment in heritage interpretation
March 5, 2014 Sharing Collections in the 21st Century: What can museums do to offer access to their collections beyond the museum site?
March 12, 2014 Diverse evil persons: Dialogues with the past through biographies and the textures of space