Did you know that the Yorkshire Wolds is the site of a meteorite fall, the largest to be observed crashing to the Earth?

Or that the Wolds plays host to the oldest horse race in the country, the Kiplingcotes Derby, which has been taking place every year since 1519?

These are just some of the extraordinary stories revealed in a new book about Yorkshire’s forgotten landscape.


Photographer Simon Palmour has captured the mystery of this beautiful, but often overlooked, part of the county in his words-and-pictures photo essay devoted to the Wolds.

The High Wolds: A Photo Essay contains more than 100 stunning images, in black and white and colour, with text exploring the rich history and geography of The Wolds.

Hidden history

A captivating landscape at Wharram Percy
Hidden railway tunnels, a single hiker on a lonely bridleway, a wintry sun shining on an ancient Roman Road, Simon’s photographs reveal the striking light and natural textures of the area, reminding us of the dignity and majesty that can be found in this unheralded part of the world.

The book is the product of a ten-year quest by the York photographer to “do justice to what should be a much more appreciated landscape.”


Simon, whose work has appeared in exhibitions throughout the UK including at the Royal Geographical Society, said the area is Yorkshire’s best-kept secret:

  • The Wolds is not a National Park, it is not an area of outstanding natural beauty and it’s barely known in Yorkshire, never mind nationally.

    But I can’t help feeling if this landscape was just outside London, it would be world-renowned.

    Over the years, I have delved deeper and deeper into the Wolds and been rewarded with some treasured sights and memories. This book is my way of sharing these neglected gems with others.

The High Wolds

High Wolds cover

The High Wolds: A Photo Essay is available as an A4 book on high quality paper at £20.

As an introductory offer post and packing is free, and there is a 20% reduction on orders of 2 or more books if ordered direct from Simon at palmour@gmail.com.

The book is also available on Amazon.