13 wonderful old photographs that show how York Railway Station has changed down the years

It's full steam ahead on platform 9 at York station in around 1956
13 Sep 2015 @ 6.37 pm
| History, Transport
It's full steam ahead on platform 9 at York station in around 1956
It’s full steam ahead on platform 9 at York station in around 1956. Photographs: National Railway Museum

These remarkable photographs show the changing face of York Railway Station.

They are from the archives at the National Railway Museum, which is preparing a dynamic new exhibition which will showcase the changing architectural history of some of Britain’s most iconic stations.

Destination Stations is a free-entry collection that takes visitors on a journey through the evolving architectural history of Britain’s railway stations, chronologically exploring their changing roles and appearances.

This is way back to 1910, with a series of locomotives ready to depart
This is way back to 1910, with a series of locomotives ready to depart
Tickets please: a young passenger heads off on his travels from York station in 1950
Tickets please: a young passenger heads off on his travels from York station in 1950

Destination Stations

National Railway Museum, York YO26 4XJ

Sept 25 – Jan 24

Free

National Railway Museum website

Taking over from the successful Playing Trains exhibition, it’s the latest in a series of dynamic, temporary exhibitions situated in the museum’s gallery space.

Broken into four key periods, the exhibition tracks the development of railway stations over time including the rudimentary stopping points of the 1800s, the Victorian architectural masterpieces which coincided with the railway boom, the functional passenger hubs of the 20th century and the iconic modern-day stations which combine rich architectural heritage with the needs of the 21st century.

Skinny vanilla lattes were definitely not on the menu at York station tearoom in 1905
Skinny vanilla lattes were definitely not on the menu at York station tearoom in 1905

The exhibition has been curated and designed to offer an impressive visual experience which echoes the architectural impact and sheer scale of some of the UK’s most recognisable stations.

York's old station, pictured in 1950
York’s old station, pictured in 1950
Platforms 2 and 3 at York station are all but destroyed by an air raid on April 29th 1942
Platforms 2 and 3 at York station are all but destroyed by an air raid on April 29th 1942

It features striking images and items from the museum’s extensive collection, including architectural fragments, paintings, models and photographs from across history alongside loaned artefacts from key architectural archives.

Way out, man: York station in 1969
Way out, man: York station in 1969
Colour arrives at the station in 1981
Colour arrives at the station in 1981

There are also exciting new digital features such as computer-generated flythroughs and interviews which explore the modern station’s future as a desirable leisure destination for people who are constantly on the move.

Rush hour at York station in 1948 was ever so slightly quieter than it is today
Rush hour at York station in 1948 was ever so slightly quieter than it is today
York station's sweeping roofline is shown off to great effect in this photograph from 1970
York station’s sweeping roofline is shown off to great effect in this photograph from 1970
Ellen Tait, interpretation developer at the NRM, said:

Station architecture has undergone significant changes over time, from the earliest stations which were focused on trains rather than passengers to the luxury shops and restaurants that line the halls of stations like St Pancras International today.

I’m sure the public will be fascinated by the range of unusual artefacts and beautiful objects that offer us new insights into the history of the nation’s stations.

A group gather to admire York station's newly-painted spandrels in 1971
A group gather to admire York station’s newly-painted spandrels in 1971
Coming into the modern era, York station in 1987
Coming into the modern era, York station in 1987
Dick Turpin's life would have been so much easier if he'd taken the advice of this 1934 poster
Dick Turpin’s life would have been so much easier if he’d taken the advice of this 1934 poster


‘It could be the biggest attraction since Jorvik’ – city urged to save historic building

Gallery: Giant crane lowers new York bridge into place

York to host blockbuster exhibition of Hollywood star’s life and loves